Get a Job!

Loot by Rebekah Bennington

Hello friends!

In the Guild Hall section of the Town chapter Torchbearer1Page 91 we note that adventurers can use the Guild Hall to find work. It’s a great option if adventurers find themselves short of coin while in town, but as written the jobs only pay out a pouch of silver and there isn’t much guidance for GMs about what sorts of jobs the guilds might provide.

A while back, Luke was giving my adventure, The Secret Vault of the Queen of Thieves, a once-over, and got inspired by the two new town locations I include there: The Docks and the Thieves’ Guild. Here’s the result.

By default, these jobs are only available in the dwarven halls, bustling metropolis and busy crossroads because they’re the only settlements with guild halls. You could add these to other settlements with a bit of finessing though: In a religious bastion, perhaps various temples offer work in a fashion similar to guild halls, for instance.

Available Work

You can look to pick up a little work in this town if you have time to kill and a purse to fill. You need to know who to ask though. So finding work requires a Circles test. If you pass the test with extra successes, you’ve got multiple options: You may take your current result or choose the next higher or next lower job. If you meet the obstacle but don’t exceed it, you’re stuck with the result of the roll. If you fail the test, the GM gives you a twist or condition.

Dwarven Halls: Ob 4
Bustling Metropolis: Ob 2
Busy Crossroads: Ob 3

Finding Work Lifestyle Cost: +1 (this covers the Circles test; there are always bribes to be paid)

These jobs are the only ones on offer this town phase. The GM should generate the pay based on the appropriate entry. The employer will state what’s on offer, but payment is only made on completion of the job to the client’s satisfaction.

The task column describes possible tasks that will need to be completed to collect your pay. This could consist of a single test, a conflict, or even a side adventure.

Business is Business

Doing work in town (making tests to complete a job) counts as personal business and increases your lifestyle cost. Therefore you want to complete your work as efficiently as possible.

Available Work Table (2d6)

RollJobTaskPay (roll 1d6)*
2Speak to rival guild
leadership about
harboring a criminal
Convince, Intimidate,
Persuade
1: Large sack of copper
2-4: Satchel of silver
5-6: Satchel of gold
3Speak to rival guild
leadership about
missing guild
member or client
Convince, Intimidate,
Persuade
1: Small sack of copper
2-4: Small sack of silver
5-6: Small sack of gold
4Speak to rival guild
leadership about
missing shipment
of materials
Intimidate, Search1: Small sack of copper
2-4: Small sack of silver
5-6: Small sack of gold
5Speak to rival guild
leadership about
outstanding debt
Convince, Intimidate,
Persuade
1: Small sack of copper
2-4: Small sack of silver
5-6: Small sack of gold
6Collect bills
from wayward
adventurers
Intimidate, Persuade,
Shake down
1-3: Small sack of copper
4-5: Pouch of silver
6: Pouch of gold
7Stand watch duty
for wealthy guild
member
Roll new
Town Event
1-3: Small sack of copper
4-5: Pouch of silver
6: Pouch of gold
8Transport an item
from the guild hall
to a hotel in town
Navigate, Carry,
Guard
1-3: Small sack of copper
4-5: Pouch of silver
6: Pouch of gold
9Transport an item
from the guild hall
to the town
government
Carry, Guard,
Convince
1: Small sack of copper
2-4: Small sack of silver
5-6: Small sack of gold
10Transport an item to
a home in a nearby
settlement
Navigate, Carry,
Guard
1: Small sack of copper
2-4: Small sack of silver
5-6: Small sack of gold
11Borrow prized item
from rival guild
Steal1: Small sack of copper
2-4: Small sack of silver
5-6: Small sack of gold
12Speak to temple
priests about
inefficacy of
recent sacrifice
Intimidate1: Large sack of copper
2-4: Satchel of silver
5-6: Satchel of gold

Note (*)

  • Pouch of silver: 1D, pack 1
  • Pouch of gold: 2D, pack 1
  • Small sack of copper: 1D, pack 2
  • Small sack of silver: 2D, pack 2
  • Small sack of gold: 4D, pack 2
  • Large sack of copper: 3D, Pack 6
  • Satchel of silver: 3D, Pack 3
  • Satchel of gold: 6D, Pack 3

What do you think? Let us know if you use any of this stuff. We want to hear about it!

Lords of the Land

The Wild Hunt of Odin, by Peter Nicolai Arbo (1872)
The Wild Hunt of Odin, by Peter Nicolai Arbo (1872)

Hello friends!

We know that settlements in Torchbearer often have temples and shrines to various Immortals—they’re among the locations you can visit  during the town phase. But the temples and shrines are generic. It’s left to the GM to fill in the details. By default, people in Torchbearer give devotion to many Immortals. Most are simply worshipped collectively as the “Lords.” But it is not uncommon for settlements to pay special attention to a Young Lord: say Yngve the Lord of Sowing, an incarnation of the Lords of Plenty.

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The Power and the Word

Hello friends! Note that I’ll be at PAX East next Thursday, so there likely will be no post next week.

The Fury of the Lords of Life and Death is a potent prayer given to first-level clerics. But perhaps it doesn’t quite fit the concept of your character? Just for you, here are seven alternative prayers for your cleric.

Choose one blessing. Your cleric knows this blessing in place of Fury of the Lords of Life and Death. Your cleric may use this blessing once per phase. Breadth determines who gets the advantage dice. Each blessing has a duration of one turn.

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The Sea Awaits

Sjøtrollet (The Sea Troll) by Theodor Kittelsen, 1887 

Hello friends!

In the Icelandic sagas, draugr are malevolent beings. It was said that you could tell who was likely to become a draugr in death because they died sitting up — in other words, alone as a miser rather than in bed and surrounded by loved ones. Sea-draugr are something else again. Though they share many characteristics of their land-based ‘cousins’, the tales seem to reflect the loss and guilt felt by those left behind when their loved ones were lost at sea and unable to be laid to rest with their ancestors.

In these stories, the sea-draugr often seek to return home and take up their old lives, only to be refused and shunned by their living families. The living are left with feelings of guilt and shame from these encounters, while the dead must return to their frigid, watery graves.

The sea-draugr play an important role the Bridge of the Damned adventure, so here’s a first look. What do you think?

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